Mid-Week Motivation for the Caregiver….Quote #4


“One person caring about another represents life’s greatest value.” 

JIM ROHN

Quick Advice for Millennial Caregivers

The “Millennial” generation has been unfairly labeled the “Me, Me, Me” generation. We’re surrounded by negative stereotypes describing our uncaring, self-centered, technology-driven personalities. If we care only for ourselves, why is the number of Millennial caregivers rising? Apparently, our personalities aren’t engrossed in self-appreciation. We ARE concerned with the health and well-being of aging or ailing loved-ones.

Young caregivers are faced with the challenges of caregiving AND creating stable households for their growing families. We’re maturing and searching for a life path while nurturing those who once cared for us. Creating a successful caregiving/life balance requires exploratory research and preliminary planning.

1.) Understand Care-Recipient’s Health Condition

Caregivers are healthcare advocates for their patients. Before or during the caregiving process, research and explore the care-recipient’s health concerns. Educate yourself on the care required for his/her current and underlying conditions. Use learned knowledge to communicate effectively with nurses and physicians. Create a care plan addressing all health concerns.

2.) Know Employer’s Policies

Many young caregivers are actively engaged in the workforce. Raising families requires dependable income. Healthcare appointments and daily errands cause conflicting schedules. Familiarize yourself with your employer’s vacation and absence policies. Research caregiving entitlements offered through local and federal governments.

3.) Create Household Budget

Often caregivers are unable to work because of the severity of the patient’s health condition or amount of required care. Households are forced to survive on one income in a “two” income society. Living on a limited income requires effective money management. Budget for savings allowance and research financial planning options benefiting your future goals. Plan now for later! Read, Caregivers, try to utilize your resources! for possible benefits available to you and the care-recipient.

4.) Accept Assistance

Devotion to the well-being of another is stressful. Avoid eventual burnout by delegating errands and caregiving duties to family and friends. Reach out to homecare agencies and research respite care options. Discuss with family the need for a support system. Caregiving is demanding and limits self-care time. Accept assistance from dependable sources. Stay healthy and provide consistent quality care for your loved-one.

5.) Don’t Forget Your Future

Caregiving is circumstantial and can be planned or spontaneous. Young caregivers usually have a “life” path before dedicating their lives to loved-ones. Don’t let caregiving eliminate your future ambitions. Try to follow your intended path. Remember, there’s life after caregiving. Plan for your future!

Millennial caregivers manage and support aging loved-ones while raising families. Their devotion leaves limited time for self-care. Avoid caregiver stress and burnout through research and advanced planning. Utilize available resources and provide quality care for your loved-one. Thank you for reading! Please share!

Mid-Week Motivation for the Caregiver….Quote #3


“Caring for our seniors is perhaps the greatest responsibility we have. Those who walked before us have given so much and made possible the life we all enjoy.”

SENATOR JOHN HOEVEN

Mid-Week Motivation for the Caregiver….Quote #2

“To care for those who once cared for us is one of the highest honors.” — Tia Walker, author


Recovering from Burnout while still Caregiving

You’ve noticed a change in your mood and temperament.  Your bright spirit is dim.  Avoiding social interaction has become part of your daily routine.  Happiness no longer compliments your face.  You feel lonely and secluded, almost depressed.  Caregiving duties are still being completed but not with the same vigor and enthusiasm.  Your fast-thinking logic has been replaced with slow what-if’sSound familiar?  Most caregivers can identify and empathize with these feelings.  These mixed emotions are warning signs of caregiver stress.  Ignoring these symptoms will result in caregiver burnout.  Trust me, I know.  Yes, there are ways you can prevent caregiver stress, but how can a caregiver recover from burnout while still providing care?

You’re overwhelmed, stressed, and on the verge of throwing in the towel.  I CAN’T DO THIS ANYMORE!  But walking out the door is not an option; you must continue the daily care regimen.  The patient’s well-being is dependent on you.  Once you begin manifesting thoughts of defeat, you’ve entered the caregiver burnout phase.  Burnout will cause a decline in your mental and physical health.  This decline will result in subpar care for your loved-one.  It’s the “trickle-down” effect and it begins with you.

You’ve diagnosed yourself with caregiver burnout.  How can you reverse its effects and still provide quality care?  You can’t do it on your own.  If you’re suffering from burnout, you must voice your thoughts and opinions to family members, friends, or the attending physician.  Reaching out is not admitting defeat.  You’re recognizing the need for third party help in order to successfully care for your patient. 

Instate a dependable support group to help with caregiving duties.  Recovery involves alleviating some of the daily stress that contributed to your mental and physical burnout.  Discuss ways they can help YOU cope with caregiver stress.  Don’t be shy!  Designate daily caregiving duties to dependable family members and friends.  Don’t know where to start when assigning caregiving responsibilities?  Read, How to Help a Caregiver.

Reaching the burnout phase takes time….it doesn’t happen overnight.  It sneaks up on you.  It’s difficult to recognize the symptoms of caregiver stress because your engaged and focused on providing quality care for your loved-one.  Ideally, a caregiver would never suffer from stress or burnout.  However, it’s part of caregiving’s brutal reality.  Trying to combat mental and physical exhaustion while still maintaining a stable environment is extremely difficult without proper support.  Being overwhelmed results in the deterioration of quality care.  

The most effective strategy for recovering from caregiver burnout while still caregiving is ASK FOR HELP.  Without help the everyday stress of your monotonous daily routine will continue to wreak havoc on your own health, creating a less-than satisfactory caregiving environment.  Ultimately you want the best possible care for your loved-one.  Allow them good quality care by taking the initiative to engage others in your caregiver duties.  Reaching out will bring success to your burnout recovery and allow you to continue your caregiving journey.  Did you find this post helpful?  Let me know by leaving a comment.  Feel free to share this post with anyone who could benefit from the information.  Thank you for reading and stay well!  

          

Holiday Gifts for that Special Senior in Your Life

Finding a perfect holiday gift can be mind-boggling, especially when the gift is for an elder.  What do you buy your aging parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles?  While caregiving, I did A LOT of successful and unsuccessful holiday shopping for my grandmother.  These are my TOP 10 gift suggestions for your elderly loved-ones this holiday season.

  1. Framed Family Photo/Digital Photo Frame
  2. Favorite Record Album
  3. Heated Throw Blanket
  4. Monogrammed Pajamas
  5. His/Her Slippers
  6. Pillow Massager
  7. Digital Reader
  8. Robot Vacuum
  9. No-Install Grab Bar
  10. YOUR TIME

The elderly, like everyone, enjoy being noticed and appreciated.  The greatest gift of all is devoting a few spare minutes to that special senior in your life.  Let them know they’re not forgotten.  A visit and chat is cherished more than an expensive gift.  Take time to express your appreciation this holiday season.  What are your favorite holiday gifts for aging loved-ones?  Let me know by leaving a comment!  Thank you and happy shopping! 

How to Help a Caregiver

We caregivers are experts at keeping a “happy” face, even when times lack happiness and joy.  Our constant smiles and understanding give the impression everything’s always OK.  True feelings are pushed aside for the benefit of the patient.  We never ask for help because caregiving duties are solely our responsibility.  However, there are times when we need help, but don’t voice our feelings.

When asked if he/she needs help, a caregiver will often respond, “No thank you.  I have everything under control.  I appreciate the offer.”  How can you help a caregiver that refuses assistance?  Try indirect help.  Provide items or services that make their caregiving duties easier.

  1. Provide encouragement in the form of a card or casual conversation.  Show appreciation for their devotion.
  2. Caregiving is costly especially when living on a limited income.  Provide a gift card that can be used for everyday expenses.
  3. Most caregivers have very limited time for errands.  Volunteer to grocery shop or pick up medications.
  4. Balancing family and caregiving is difficult.  Offer free childcare services to the caregiver.

Directly assisting a caregiver in their own environment can be difficult.  Most have a set daily schedule.  Any deviation from this schedule can cause unwanted stress.  How can you directly help a caregiver without interfering with their daily schedule?  

  1. Prepare meals for both the patient and caregiver.  Deliver meals a few times per week.  When preparing meals abide by proper diet restrictions.
  2. Depending on the patient’s medical condition, homecare can involve massive amounts of laundry daily.  Volunteer to pick up and drop off laundry during the week.
  3. Offer transportation for medical appointments.  “Free” hours allow the caregiver to take a break and catch up with daily tasks.
  4. Provide RESPITE CARE.  Allowing the caregiver a short-term break from their daily monotonous schedule is beneficial.  The caregiver is able to enjoy activities outside of their duties, enabling them to de-stress and recharge.  A healthy caregiver can consistently provide quality care to the patient.

Caregivers can be stubborn.  This stubbornness will eventually lead to stress and burnout.  As a third-party, you can indirectly and directly assist the caregiving process by providing your time and services.  Don’t take “NO” for an answer.  Work behind-the-scenes and provide deserved support.  Thank you and good luck!